How to Soundproof an Apartment | Soundproofing Apartments | Roost
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Soundproofing your pad

Easy ways to create a soundproof apartment

Moving into a new place and ready for some well-deserved peace and quiet? One thing that can be pretty tricky to evaluate when you’re apartment hunting is something you’ll have to live with every day — the noises of your neighborhood. Car traffic outside your window, bass-thumping next door, a dog’s incessant barking in the yard…unless you live way out in the country, chances are busy neighborhood noises might start to get to you. If you’re wondering what you can do, don’t worry. Luckily, there are some simple landlord-approved tips and tricks that can help you create a soundproof apartment.

7 ways to create a soundproof apartment

If noise is waking you up in the middle of the night, you might be willing to pay almost anything to make it stop. But because you’re living in a rental, going all out with a professional-level soundproofing job isn’t feasible — or affordable. Give some of these DIY methods of improving the soundproofing of your apartment a try.

1. Soundproof your windows  

Windows are one of the most common culprits when it comes to noise. However, most windows are not installed with sound-deadening in mind, especially single-paned windows in older buildings. You’re likely losing heat and gaining noise. Bah!

One fix can be using some rigid foam that you cut-to-fit and place in your windows. (Make sure you and your roommates or children can easily remove the foam — you never want to permanently block an exit.) 

window with white curtains on either side
Noise-reducing curtains from Wayfair

Alternatively, add a set of noise-reducing curtains. These curtains are typically heavier than standard curtains due to the additional insulation, which helps absorb the sound. Due to their extra weight, make sure your curtain rods are sturdy enough to hold them up.  Wayfair, Amazon and Ikea offer great sets for as little as $35.00.

2. Soundproof your doors

Gaps at the bottom of your door let unwanted sound in. Draft stoppers are the best tools for blocking sound and prevent drafty doors from making your apartment cold in the winter or hot in the summer. These handy draft stoppers not only help you soundproof your apartment but also save you a few bucks on energy, too.

Image courtesy of Holikme on Amazon.com

3. Talk with your neighbor (or roommate)

If you’re constantly hearing your roommate’s Alexa blasting music or you can hear your neighbors watching their TV at max volume, one of the best things to do is to bring it up politely.

Most people are unaware that their devices are bothering you, and if you don’t say anything, they’ll never know. Assume the best intent and initiate a conversation with your roommate about what’s happening and ask them to work on a resolution with you. Maybe they agree to turn it down after 10:00 p.m. Maybe they move their gaming system to a room that doesn’t share a wall with your apartment. 

If your roommate isn’t receptive, you might want to start looking for a different one when your lease is up. If your neighbor repeatedly brushes you off, you can talk with your landlord. Many leases include specific information about noise and some cities have noise ordinances, too.

4. Hang a wall tapestries or install a bookcase 

Paper-thin walls and lack of insulation is a common sound culprit in apartments. Move softer furniture up against the wall or add a tapestry to help absorb any sound vibrations coming through to help soundproof your apartment. 

white couch with art above and houseplant next to it in apartment
Courtesy of West Elm
bookcase with DVDs
Best selling bookcases at Amazon 

5. Add an area rug

If the floors in your apartment are made of hard material, such as tile, laminate, or wood, laying rugs can be a huge help. Carpets and rugs add softness and density to the floor and block soundwaves traveling through the floor. Make sure to buy the pad under your rug to help your rug absorb the noise. There are many great places to buy inexpensive, stylish rugs including, Amazon, Ikea, West Elm, WorldMarket and more. 

Small table with two pink chairs on white carpet in blue room
Rugs from Amazon

6. Play white noise or a sound machine

If you can’t neutralize the noise, try masking it with “white noise.” This strategy uses consistent, steady noise to block out irregular, louder sounds. You can choose from a variety of sounds — some people prefer a steady fan sound. Others like ocean waves or rain. The point is to find a sound that is easy for your brain to ignore.

Sound machines typically run $20-80 each. Look for features like the number and type of sounds, night light, auto shut-offs and remote or voice activation. There also tend to be two choices: machines that are mechanical (fan-based) or machines that play sounds (more like a soundtrack). Here are a few of our top picks: 

SNOOZ White Noise Sound Machine Amazon


7. Good ol’ earplugs or earbuds

Yep. Earplugs. While this doesn’t actually do anything to stop the noise, they’re one of the best ways to prevent you from hearing it.

Earplugs come in all sorts of designs, configurations, and colors (bright orange! pink!), but they’re all meant to do the same thing — block out noise. And they’re super cheap. You can find a multi-pack of earplugs for less than $5 on Amazon.

Keep in mind that some earplugs are made for specific applications, such as swimming, to keep water out. Be sure to look for earplugs that are designed to keep out noise. There are even some earplugs designed specifically for sleeping in, like Hearprotek sleeping earplugs.

Another approach is something you’re already doing–listening to your earbuds. If you’re trying to sleep, look for a sound machine app that automatically turns off your music or the sound after a while.

How to spot a soundproof apartment

One of the best ways to avoid noise is by selecting an apartment that’s on the quieter side. A few tips:

  • When you’re apartment hunting, try to visit the unit on a weekend evening or after work. You want to hear how much noise there is when it’s busiest out. 
  • Avoid any units facing busy streets, railroads, airports and nearby businesses with late hours like bars and supermarkets. Listen for noise levels outside and within the apartment. 
  • Look for units that share fewer walls and floors with neighbors. This is often a top-level, corner unit.
  • Find a place that was built more recently. Modern forms of installation and design, such as concrete floors and insulation, help to reduce noise. 
  • Steer clear of new construction sites. Excavator sounds and bulldozing can start early in the morning and go on for the better part of a year.  

Soundproofing adds up

When you’ve signed a lease and feel like you’re stuck for a while, noise can start to really drive you crazy. Instead of getting frustrated, take as many small steps as you can. Talk to your neighbors, soundproof your windows, add softer items like rugs and wall coverings, and look into a sound machine. You may not be able to get rid of all the noise, but every little bit adds up.

A quick note! Our goal is to gather and share info that’s up-to-date and helps you make great decisions as a renter. That said, the information you get directly from a provider could be a little different. Make sure to review their terms and conditions directly; and, if you see anything here that needs to be updated, please let us know! Advertising disclosure
Last Updated: October 16th, 2020